Dr. Ellenbogen's Plastic Surgery Blog

The many health benefits of kanuka honey

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

MIRACLE WORKER: Honeys are thought to be so potent at healing infections that many hospitals around the world are now turning to them.
Jamila Toderas

In our household, 2014 has been the year of the fish - my resolution being to load up our family table with kai moana and reap the benefits of all those fabulous fish oils. I am hoping that 2015 will be the year of the bee.

I love honey and sneak it into all sorts of recipes whenever I can.

I suspect I somehow inherited this honey addiction from my Yorkshire family, who spread it on crumpets to go with a cup of tea at 3 o'clock for afternoon tea.

Not only does it taste delicious, but my dad has always believed that it somehow has magical life-giving qualities as well. It turns out he may not be far wrong.

Honey is one of the world's oldest foods and has a long medicinal history. As well as offering honey up as a gift to the gods, ancient Egyptians used it as an embalming fluid and to put on dressings for wounds.

According to Dr Shaun Holt, founder and medical director of HoneyLab, a company that develops pharmaceutical products from bees and their environment, they were right on track.

HoneyLab is currently researching the health benefits of New Zealand's own kanuka honey, with some very promising results to date.

Although kanuka honey is not as well-known internationally as its big cousin manuka, it actually contains more of the "manuka factor" that enhances the antimicrobial (or antiseptic) properties of the honey.

Both these honeys are thought to be so potent at healing infections that many hospitals around the world are now turning to them.

The main uses to date seem to be in wound healing, especially in ulcers that are slow to heal, and treating skin infections caused by the "superbug" MRSA.

When honey is applied externally to wounds or skin infections, it seems to draw healing fluids and nutrients to the affected area, promoting rapid healing and regrowth of the underlying tissues.

It is thought to be more effective at clearing up infections in post-operative wounds than topical antibiotic creams, and clearly avoids adding to the huge issue of antibiotic resistance around the world.

Honey can be applied directly to wounds and then a dressing used to cover the area, but honey-impregnated dressings are now available too, which provide a slightly more expensive but less messy alternative.

Holt cautions against using the honey in your pantry to treat cuts or wounds. "It is full of impurities and can cause a bad reaction. The medicinal version we are producing is pure, pasteurised and contains a high level of the active ingredients required to be effective."

Holt's research is also focusing on the use of kanuka honey to treat rosacea, an inflammatory skin condition that causes reddening and scaling of the face. His team's controlled study using a honey- based ointment to treat rosacea has had very promising results.

"HoneyLab are about to publish results showing that our medical-grade kanuka honey formulation is very effective at treating rosacea.

"This is often treated at the moment by the long-term use of antibiotics and contributes to the WHO's number one health issue: antibiotic resistance."

Other conditions that are being studied include acne, nappy rash and cold sores.

In terms of eating honey, the jury is still out when it comes to health benefits.

"When eaten, honey is an excellent nutritional supplement, providing energy, minerals and vitamins.

"However, there are no research findings showing that, when it comes to eating honey, expensive ones with high levels of manuka factor are any better than cheaper varieties," says Holt.

But there is little doubting its therapeutic use when applied to the skin, and my prediction is that over the next few years we will understand more and more about the benefits of this wonderful product of nature.

Here's to the year of the bee.

Cathy Stephenson is a GP and medical forensic examiner.

 - Stuff

The 10 Most Extreme Plastic Surgeries Of 2014

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

1. Jordan Parke’s transformation into Kim Kardashian.
The 10 Most Extreme Plastic Surgeries Of 2014(Photo: Jordan Parke)

Jordan Parke, a 23-year-old British makeup artist, says Kim Kardashian is “the most gorgeous woman ever. Her skin is perfect, her hair, everything about her.” He’s spent a lot of money (including eyebrow tattoos and lip injections) to look more like the star. He’s not fazed by haters. “Do they think I’m going for the natural look? If I was, I’d ask for my money back,” he says.

Estimated Cost of Surgeries: $150,000

2. Human Barbie and her quest to look like a living doll.

/

(Photo: Valerie Lukyanova)

Valeria Lukyanova, also known as the Human Barbie, was everywhere this year, thanks to her fascinatingly impossible proportions. According to Lukyanova, she maintains her waistline by eating nothing but “light” and “air,” which is incredibly unhealthy unless you are a plant.

Estimated cost of surgeries: A lady never tells.

3. Human Barbie’s No. 1 rival, Human Barbie 2.

/

(Photo: News Dog Media)

As odd as having one Human Barbie is, it turns out there’s a second woman after the crown. Alina Kovalevskaya doesn’t just share a common goal with the O.G. Human Barbie, she also shares a hometown: Odessa, Ukraine. So if you’re keeping score at home, that’s two women who both want to look like Barbie and both live in the same place. They apparently used to be friends, but Kovaleskaya said the relationship “soured.”

Estimated cost of surgeries: Unknown

4. Human Ken, and his — surprise! — hatred of Human Barbie.

/

(Photo: Justin Jedlica)

You’d think Justin Jedlica, who had over 140 procedures to transform himself into a human Ken doll, would have a lot in common with Human Barbie. But he thinks she’s fake because she uses makeup and shortcuts to achieve the effect. 

Estimated cost of surgeries: $150,000

5. And, of course, Human Ken’s No. 1 rival.

/

(Photo: Celso Santebanes / Facebook)

Since there are two Human Barbies, there pretty much has to be a second Human Ken. Model Celso Santebanes even had a doll made in his likeness, so we’ve officially come full circle.
Estimated cost of surgeries: $50,000

6. This woman who got a third breast implanted (but not really).

Jasmine

(Photo: Jasmine Tridevil/Facebook)

Jasmine Tridevil had the Internet going insane after she announced she got a third boob and also wanted a reality show. Only half of that wound up being true, after it was revealed the third boob was a prosthetic and no doctor anywhere would implant a third breast onto anyone. At least Tridevil got her 15 minutes of fame.

Estimated cost of surgeries: Unknown, possibly $0?

7. Victoria Wild, the human sex doll.

/

(Photo: News Dog Media)

Wild aspires to look literally like a sex doll. “I would always dream about resembling a sexy bimbo doll with huge breasts and insanely big lips. I loved the way dolls looked and how sexy they were. They are so bright and bold. It was this fantasy in my head,” she says. Interesting.

Estimated cost of surgeries: $40,000

8. Tatiana Williams, who wanted a butt “like Kim Kardashian’s.”
Photo Credit: Landov

Williams had a series of black market procedures to get the ass she has today, an incredibly risky venture.”I don’t recommend people copy what I did — but I’m a risk taker and it has been a success,” she says. “I have no regrets about being the beautiful woman I am.”

Estimated cost of surgeries: $98,000

9. This woman who wanted to look like her own caricature.

/

(Photo: News Dog Media)

When Krystina Butel saw a caricature an artist did of her, she was immediately jealous. “She was so glamorous. She was everything that I wanted to be,” says Butel. She now has 36K-sized breasts, along with tattooed heart-shaped nipples.
Estimated cost of surgeries: $150,000

10. The women who got so much surgery in South Korea, they couldn’t get through airport security to go home.

/

(Photo: CEN)

Plastic surgery has become such a huge business in South Korea that women in nearby China started visiting to get procedures done. Some of them got work so extensive, though, that they wound up looking much different than their passport pictures. It made it incredibly difficult for them to fly back home.

 

In Brazil, Plastic Surgery Seen As A Right, Not A Privilege

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

With January first marking the start of many people's self-improvement projects, Lourdes Garcia Navarro shares a story she reported earlier this year about plastic surgery in Brazil.

This story first aired on All Things Considered on Oct. 7, 2014.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

You may beat taking this slogan to heart today - a new year, a new you. It could mean today, for example, on January 1, you're starting a diet or new workout or maybe you're simply vowing to use more sunscreen or to stop drinking. Well, these new year's resolutions to feel and look better remind me of a story I reported earlier this year about plastic surgery in Brazil.

Brazil is now the world leader in plastic surgery. It has surpassed the United States in the number of procedures, even though the U.S. has more people with more disposable income than Brazil. As I found out, many Brazilian women see surgical beautification as a right and not a privilege, and that includes Janet and Jaqueline Timal. They are 40-something-year-old sisters, and they have what they call a plastic surgery fund.

JAQUELINE TIMAL: (Through translator) I'm always saving money. When I see I've gotten enough money for another surgery, I do it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Jaqueline. She's had breast implants put in and also a tummy tuck. She's here today to do the famed Brazilian butt lift, which is the same as a boob job, but on your backside. Janet has had a tummy tuck, too, and she's also doing her breasts. That'll be five surgeries between them when this round is done. They both say this isn't about bankrupting themselves for beauty, but rather the opposite. Jaqueline says she sees the procedures as an investment.

TIMAL: (Through translator) I think we invest in beauty because it's very important for women here. You can get a better job because here, they want a good appearance, a better marriage because men care about the way you look.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Janet and Jaqueline aren't rich - far from it. Even with the surgery fund, they wouldn't be able to afford to pay for all those cosmetic procedures, they say, unless they did it here.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Janet.

JANET TIMAL: (Speaking Portuguese).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Here is the Ivo Pitanguy Institute in Rio de Janeiro, named after the famed Brazilian plastic surgeon who is renowned here for saying the poor have the right to be beautiful, too. The institute's lobby is packed as attendants call out the names of women and a few men who are waiting to be evaluated for cosmetic surgeries. This is a charity and a teaching hospital, and the surgeries given are either free of charge or heavily subsidized.

TIMAL: (Speaking Portuguese).

TIMAL: (Speaking Portuguese).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: The sisters tell me the price they are paying for the butt lift, for example, is 3,800 reals, about $1,600. At a private hospital, it could run over three times that.

Hello. How are you? It's great to see you.

FRANCESCO MAZZARONE: Hi.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We meet with Francesco Mazzarone, who now heads the institute. I ask him why it's important to provide cosmetic surgeries to the disadvantaged.

MAZZARONE: (Through translator) This is about equality, which is the philosophy Pitanguy created - equal rights to everyone. The patients come here to get back something they lost in time. We give to them the right to dream.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Why should only the wealthy have access to something that will increase self-esteem, he asks. What we do here is altruism, he says. So here are the numbers. Last year, according to the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, there were one and a half million cosmetic surgeries carried out in Brazil. That's 13 percent of all elective plastic surgeries done all over the world.

Part of the boom can be explained by women's increasing financial power. In the last 10 years, Brazil has grown economically. Salaries have gone up, as has disposable income. Women, like the Timal sisters, have overwhelmingly chosen to use that money on their appearance. That's the thing. While in the U.S., people may hide that they've had plastic surgery like it's something shameful, here, they flaunt it. The attitude is that having work done shows you care about yourself, and it's a status symbol. But the women we speak with also acknowledge there is a lot of pressure in Brazil to conform to a physical ideal.

Some here, though, balk at the idea that happiness can be achieved at the end of a scalpel. They say the image people chase is being defined by marketers and, in Brazil, it has a racial component. Marcelo Silva Ramos is an anthropologist and social scientist. Brazil imported more slaves - some 4 million - than anywhere else in the world. Today, it's a primarily a mixed-race country, but you wouldn't know it if you look on TV and in the magazines here, he says.

MARCELO SILVA RAMOS: (Through translator) If you look at the traditional body type of a Brazilian, you would see a woman with dark skin, curly hair, small breasts and a larger bottom - a body that is very different from the body marketed as desirable, which is a skinnier, taller blonde with straight hair with bigger breasts and with not many curves.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That is meant that today people who don't look the right way - and by this, he means the white way - are often excluded.

MARCELO SILVA RAMOS: (Through translator) In our culture, the view is women who look acceptable get money, social mobility, power.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Speaking Portuguese).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Take, for example, the crazy popular annual contest, Miss Bumbum. All of this year's contestants are lighter skinned.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Speaking Portuguese).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I'm at a gym in Sao Paulo, and in front of me are several scantily clad women in full makeup, many photographers. This is a press event. And they're working what you and I would call politely our glutes, but what is called in Brazil bumbum. The women here are contestants in the yearly Miss Bumbum contest, which, as you can probably figure out, crowns Brazil's best butt.

CLAUDIA ALENDE: I'm Claudia Alende.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That the 22-year-old front runner who looks like actress Megan Fox. I mean, almost exactly, right down to the blue contact lenses she has over her naturally brown eyes.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So tell me, why are you doing the Miss Bumbum contest?

CLAUDIA ALENDE: Because the contest is famous around the world, and I want to be recognized around the world and become famous, too. (Laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: She says the contest is a way for her to become a TV presenter or an actress. The rules of the contest allow for plastic surgery anywhere but on the backside. She openly admits she's had work done.

ALENDE: Because was, like, moda.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Fashion.

ALENDE: Fashion - was like - was like everybody is doing, and I do.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Previous Miss Bumbum contestants have indeed gone on to arguably bigger and better things. One became a TV presenter. Others have become actors, professional dancers on TV. But for most of the women I speak with, their dreams - the ones the Pitanguy Institute say they are giving them the right to - are much smaller. We meet Maria da Gloria de Sousa on a beach in Rio, on a chilly blustery day. She's unemployed but has had six surgeries at the Pitanguy Institute and speaks about her procedures with that characteristic Brazilian humor and openness.

MARIA DA GLORIA DE SOUSA: (Speaking Portuguese).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I'm almost an android, she tells. I've done my breasts three times. I didn't stop there. I did a tummy tuck, and then I did lipo, and, lastly, I did my bottom, she says proudly. She says she spent the equivalent of the cost of three cars on her operations.

DE SOUSA: (Speaking Portuguese).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I'm much happier. There's no doubt about it, she tells me. My bottom will never sag. My breasts will never sag. They will always be there - hard. It's very good to look into the mirror and feel fine, she says. She waves goodbye and, smiling, sashays down the beach, and nothing jiggles.

I recorded that story back in October for our series The Changing Lives of Women. Whatever your aspirations for the new year, thank you for joining us today. Happy new year. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

From rice cakes to red meat, MailOnline reveals the WORST foods for your skin

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

  • Studies show milk causes acne, because of the hormones it contains
  • High levels of sugar in dates cause pore-clogging oil to be produced
  • Blue cheese upsets the body's balance of fats, causing inflammation
  • Alcohol exacerbates psoriasis and means bruises show up more easily 

By ANNA HODGEKISS FOR MAILONLINE and MADLEN DAVIES FOR MAILONLINE

A peachy complexion isn't just about the creams you slather on your face - it's also about what you pile on your plate.

‘The best weapon against skin ageing is your fork,’ explains top nutritionist and skin specialist, Karen Fischer. 

‘Eating the right foods supplies your skin with the nutrients it needs to produce new collagen, fight AGEs and look healthier and younger,' Ms Fisher said.

Sugar can cause damaging molecules called Advanced Glycation End products (or AGEs) to form in skin, causing premature ageing.

But it's not the only trigger, as experts warn saturated fat, dairy products and alcohol should be avoided.

Here, MailOnline reveals the top culprits that are ruining your skin...

RICE CAKES

Rice cakes, like any other unnaturally white foods, are refined carbohydrates, broken down into sugar by the body. This in turn triggers destructive molecules called Advanced Glycation End products (or AGEs) to form

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Rice cakes, like any other unnaturally white foods, are refined carbohydrates, broken down into sugar by the body. This in turn triggers destructive molecules called Advanced Glycation End products (or AGEs) to form

Rice cakes were hailed as the favourite food of supermodels - who claimed their low levels of fat made them a quick route to a thin physique. 

But we now know rice cakes, like any other unnaturally white foods, are refined carbohydrates, broken down into sugar by the body.

Too much sugar in the blood causes glucose molecules to attach to the proteins in collagen - a protein that allows skin to stay supple - to form destructive molecules called Advanced Glycation End products (or AGEs).

These sticky brown compounds stiffen the otherwise elastic fibres in the skin, creating lines, blotches and wrinkles.

The more sugar a person eats, the more AGEs develop. 

BLUE CHEESE  

Blue cheeses such as stilton can wreak havoc with the skin, dermatologists warn

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Blue cheeses such as stilton can wreak havoc with the skin, dermatologists warn

Dermatologist, Dr Ross Perry, of the Cosmedics Skin Clinic in Harley Street, London, told MailOnline cheese can trigger skin problems

'This is perhaps due to the fat content,' he said.

'Stiltons and blue cheese tend to be the worst, perhaps due to the strength of them. Other rich foods such as Port can also have an affect like this.'

Researchers suggest one theory for this is that saturated fat increase levels of omega-6 fatty acids in the body, which compete with another type of fat, omega-3.

If levels of these two fats are not balanced in the body, more inflammation and acne occurs.  

WATERMELONS AND DATES 

High GI foods, such as watermelon, can have an effect on acne because of the hormonal fluctuations that are triggered

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High GI foods, such as watermelon, can have an effect on acne because of the hormonal fluctuations that are triggered

Eating high GI foods - foods that are absorbed into the bloodstream quickly - is thought to have a direct effect on the severity of acne because of the hormonal fluctuations that are triggered.

These foods include watermelons and dates, as well as the usual white refined sugar suspects.  

High GI foods cause a spike in hormone levels including insulin which is thought to instigate production of sebum - the oily substance which blocks pores, causing spots.

A 2007 Australian study showed that young males who were put on a strict low GI diet noticed a significant improvement in the severity of their acne.

A 2002 study published in the Archives of Dermatology found people living in the Kitavan Islands (off the coast of Papua New Guinea) and the Aché hunter-gathers of Paraguay do not suffer from acne and this is associated with their low glycemic diet, consisting mainly of fresh fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins. 

MILK

Milk is thought to affect acne because of the hormones it contains. A 2007 study carried out by Harvard School of Public Health found that there was a clear link between those who drank milk regularly and suffered with acne.

Interestingly, those who drank skimmed milk suffered with the worst breakouts, with a 44 per cent increase in the likelihood of developing blemishes. It is thought that processing the milk increases the levels of hormones in the drink.

A more recent study, published in 2012 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found the risk of moderate to severe acne 'increased with increased milk consumption,' with an odds ratio of 1.78 with a stronger connection seen between skimmed milk than whole fat milk.

Dermatologist Sam Bunting told MailOnline she always suggests minimising dairy intake as it seems to contribute to an acne flare. 

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So-called 'healthy' cereals are also often packed with skin-damaging sugar

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Dermatologist Sam Bunting told MailOnline she always suggests minimising dairy intake as it seems to contribute to an acne flare. So-called 'healthy' cereals are also often packed with skin-damaging sugar 

What are the best and worst foods for your skin?



HEALTHY CEREALS 

Cereals are often marketed as a healthy breakfast, but they can contain up to 37 per cent sugar. A sugar content of over 15 per cent is considered to be high. 

Research is increasingly showing that sugar ages the skin as it makes the skin lose the plump, elastic qualities that underlie a youthful appearance. 

Scientists from the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands, and Unilever in the UK, measured the blood sugar levels of 600 men and women aged between 50 and 70.

They then showed photographs of these people to a board of 60 independent assessors and found that those with higher blood sugar looked older than those with lower blood sugar.

In fact for every 1mm/litre increase in blood sugar, the perceived age of that person rose by five months. 

Sugar can also promote the growth of pore-clogging cell and trigger the body to promote more oil - both factors which can cause acne.

MEAT

Red meat can cause the skin to flush and also trigger acne, dermatologists warn

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Red meat can cause the skin to flush and also trigger acne, dermatologists warn

Dr Perry told MailOnline his patients often complain meat makes their skin flushed and red.

Some experts believe red meat is linked to bad skin because it can increase levels of the male sex hormone testosterone in the body.

People who are more sensitive to testosterone are more likely to suffer breakouts.

This is because higher levels of the hormones lead to more skin cells growing, and more sebum being produced. This can, in turn, block pores and causes acne. 

ALCOHOL 

'Alcohol is the worst thing for skin without a shadow of a doubt,' Dr Perry said.

'The alcohol and the sugar dry out the skin. Alcohol also causes flushing when it has been broken down.'

Studies have found high levels of alcohol consumption exacerbate the skin condition psoriasis, which often presents itself as reddish spots and patches covered with silvery scales. 

It also causing bloating and dark circles under your eyes and can lead to wrinkles and premature ageing. 

The skin may also become dry and flaky because booze causes dehydration, and alcohol also depletes vitamin C in the body's tissues, so bruises will show up more clearly.

'Alcohol is the worst thing for skin without a shadow of a doubt,' says Dr Perry 

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'Alcohol is the worst thing for skin without a shadow of a doubt,' says Dr Perry 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2886067/From-rice-cakes-red-meat-MailOnline-reveals-WORST-foods-skin.html#ixzz3NfzMvpLf 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 

7 Times Plastic Surgery Had Nicki Minaj Looking Crazy, Allegedly

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

If Hip-Hop had to point to a baddest chick in the game then most votes would go to Nicki Minaj. But the Queens native has had her off moments.


Whether the make you choose to accept it or not, Nicki is another celebrity allegedly chose the route of cosmetic surgery.
It is rumored that the “Anaconda” rapper has gotten breast augmentation, ass implants and possibly a nose job.

While her glam team keeps her looking top notch, there have been times where the scalpel work did not compliment her.

So we present the 7 times plastic surgery had Nicki Minaj looking crazy. Coincidently Moguldom Studios has a new documentary titled Knifed Up that details this growing problem.

- See more at: http://hiphopwired.com/2014/12/31/barb-down-7-times-plastic-surgery-had-...

The many health benefits of kanuka honey

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

MIRACLE WORKER: Honeys are thought to be so potent at healing infections that many hospitals around the world are now turning to them.
Jamila Toderas

In our household, 2014 has been the year of the fish - my resolution being to load up our family table with kai moana and reap the benefits of all those fabulous fish oils. I am hoping that 2015 will be the year of the bee.

I love honey and sneak it into all sorts of recipes whenever I can.

I suspect I somehow inherited this honey addiction from my Yorkshire family, who spread it on crumpets to go with a cup of tea at 3 o'clock for afternoon tea.

Not only does it taste delicious, but my dad has always believed that it somehow has magical life-giving qualities as well. It turns out he may not be far wrong.

Honey is one of the world's oldest foods and has a long medicinal history. As well as offering honey up as a gift to the gods, ancient Egyptians used it as an embalming fluid and to put on dressings for wounds.

According to Dr Shaun Holt, founder and medical director of HoneyLab, a company that develops pharmaceutical products from bees and their environment, they were right on track.

HoneyLab is currently researching the health benefits of New Zealand's own kanuka honey, with some very promising results to date.

Although kanuka honey is not as well-known internationally as its big cousin manuka, it actually contains more of the "manuka factor" that enhances the antimicrobial (or antiseptic) properties of the honey.

Both these honeys are thought to be so potent at healing infections that many hospitals around the world are now turning to them.

The main uses to date seem to be in wound healing, especially in ulcers that are slow to heal, and treating skin infections caused by the "superbug" MRSA.

When honey is applied externally to wounds or skin infections, it seems to draw healing fluids and nutrients to the affected area, promoting rapid healing and regrowth of the underlying tissues.

It is thought to be more effective at clearing up infections in post-operative wounds than topical antibiotic creams, and clearly avoids adding to the huge issue of antibiotic resistance around the world.

Honey can be applied directly to wounds and then a dressing used to cover the area, but honey-impregnated dressings are now available too, which provide a slightly more expensive but less messy alternative.

Holt cautions against using the honey in your pantry to treat cuts or wounds. "It is full of impurities and can cause a bad reaction. The medicinal version we are producing is pure, pasteurised and contains a high level of the active ingredients required to be effective."

Holt's research is also focusing on the use of kanuka honey to treat rosacea, an inflammatory skin condition that causes reddening and scaling of the face. His team's controlled study using a honey- based ointment to treat rosacea has had very promising results.

"HoneyLab are about to publish results showing that our medical-grade kanuka honey formulation is very effective at treating rosacea.

"This is often treated at the moment by the long-term use of antibiotics and contributes to the WHO's number one health issue: antibiotic resistance."

Other conditions that are being studied include acne, nappy rash and cold sores.

In terms of eating honey, the jury is still out when it comes to health benefits.

"When eaten, honey is an excellent nutritional supplement, providing energy, minerals and vitamins.

"However, there are no research findings showing that, when it comes to eating honey, expensive ones with high levels of manuka factor are any better than cheaper varieties," says Holt.

But there is little doubting its therapeutic use when applied to the skin, and my prediction is that over the next few years we will understand more and more about the benefits of this wonderful product of nature.

Here's to the year of the bee.

Cathy Stephenson is a GP and medical forensic examiner.

 - Stuff

Lady Gaga takes 50 selfies for campaign

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

Lady Gaga

According to WWD, Gaga has shot 50 selfies which will be published in various Japanese newspapers during the first week of 2015.

 

Los Angeles:Singer Lady Gaga has been signed as the new face of cosmetic brand Shiseido’s 2015 New Year’s campaign and has also shot 50 selfies.

According to WWD, Gaga has shot 50 selfies which will be published in various Japanese newspapers during the first week of 2015.

The bulk of the advertisements will be published on Jan 1 and the rest on Jan 5, reports peoplestylewatch.com.

- See more at: http://www.eni.network24.co/entertainment/lady-gaga-takes-50-selfies-for...

 

Jenny McCarthy Plastic Surgery? New Year’s Eve Appearance Draws Comparison To Joan Rivers

Fri, 01/02/2015



 

Jenny McCarthy Plastic Surgery? New Year's Eve Appearance Draws Comparison To Joan Rivers

Jenny McCarthy set Twitter afire with her hosting duties on Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve, with dozens of posts suggesting that the 42-year-old may have gotten some very obvious plastic surgery.

McCarthy once again picked up hosting duties for the annual New Year’s Eve celebration, mingling among the revelers in Times Square opposite host Ryan Seacrest. But the performance may have been overshadowed by McCarthy’s appearance, which many Twitter users believe shows signs of having work done.

Many of them noted a likeness to the late Joan Rivers, who was famous for her love of plastic surgery.

Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/1719579/jenny-mccarthy-plastic-surgery-new-year...

 

Skin was in for 2014

Tue, 12/30/2014



 

YE Year of the Flesh

Jennifer Lopez, left, and Iggy Azalea perform Oct. 24 at CBS Radio’s second annual We Can Survive concert at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles.

BY LEANNE ITALIE

NEW YORK -- Skin was definitely in, but was 2014 all about the big, bold booty or a sheer reveal up top?

On runways, Marc Jacobs sent up-and-comer Kendall Jenner out during February’s New York Fashion Week with nipples clearly visible under a taupe knit top. Christian Siriano closed his show in September with ice blue crystals on a barely there trouser set, nipples on display.

Look no further than awards shows, music videos and magazine covers for fuller rears, compliments of Iggy Azalea, Jennifer Lopez and Nicki Minaj, along with Jenner’s big sis Kim Kardashian and Rihanna, the Council of Fashion Designers of America’s style icon of the year.

Rihanna showed off every inch top to bottom when she collected the award, but curvy newcomer Meghan Trainor said it best in the rear department with her breakout, Grammy nominated hit: “All About that Bass.”

Where would Instagram be without booty? Well, nipples gained ground in pilfered nude celebrity selfies, RiRi’s bare, pierced assets on the cover of French magazine Lui and among proud “Free the Nipple” activists, including Scout Willis and Miley Cyrus, who challenged Instagram’s ban. Scout and others flashed and pranced topless in public from New York to Moscow. A film by Lina Esco of the same name turned into a hashtag.

As for the bass, Kardashian loves showing off hers and signed on to help Paper magazine with another body-baring declaration, #breaktheinternet. She did it with the pop of a Champagne cork that arched a stream of bubbly over her head into a glass resting nicely on her derriere for the cover.

But she also advanced the cause of the nipple when she went full-frontal on the magazine’s inside pages, followed soon after by a topless Madonna in Interview.

Why did Kardashian do it? She said on the Australian TV show “The Project” that she loved working with famed photographer Jean-Paul Goude on the Paper shoot and considered it an “art project.”

“It taught me to do what you want to do. Everyone should do what they’re comfortable with, and I’m never one to preach but I felt really positive and really good about myself. I love the photos. I did it for me,” she told host Rove McManus.

Alas, McManus wasn’t able to repeat the glass-balancing trick. “You don’t have as big a butt as I do,” Kardashian noted after she attempted to show him how it’s done.

Backside or bare female breast -- either way, it seemed light years from 2004. That’s when the live Super Bowl halftime show on CBS turned into Nipplegate for Janet Jackson, taking over chatter about nudity, leading to a court battle over fines (since overturned) and temporarily derailing her career.

Jackson’s split-second slip included a now-quaint nipple shield under the piece of leather Justin Timberlake ripped off her outfit, either accidentally or on purpose. Today, flaunting one’s pasties is downright passe.

Just ask Cyrus, who rocked a pair as she performed at Paper magazine’s Break the Internet party during Art Basel Miami Beach in celebration of its nakey jaunt with Kardashian.

Fashion darling Alexander Wang did his part in Year of the Flesh. He previewed his new Denim x Alexander line on Instagram with a fully nude but strategically posed model chilling in an easy chair, jeans pulled below the knee.

In Siriano’s case, he was looking to evoke the massive glass sculptures of controversial Australian sculptor Sergio Redegalli. His core customer is more society lady than nipple-baring It girl, but he said in a recent interview the delicate sheer crystal top with pants to match is the most popular of his designs borrowed by stylists for clients and photo projects -- often with a lining added.

“Now, you see people are celebrating the body. It’s different. Very different,” he said. “I went there more as an inspirational fantasy, but we’ve had pretty much every publication pull that look for editorial shoots. It’s been done in art for so long and fashion is a form of art.”

The booty has also had a big year for enhancements in the offices of plastic surgeons.

Dr. Scot Glasberg on the Upper East Side of Manhattan said techniques on buttock augmentation have greatly improved over the last 10 years, with uncomfortable and unnatural implants replaced by the self-explanatory fat transfer.

“You get a much more natural look,” he said.

In 2014, Glasberg saw an increase of about 10 percent in requests for cosmetic butt enhancement over 2013 among his patients, with about 10,000 done nationwide by members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

When compared to breast augmentation, nose jobs and face lifts, the number is small but on the move, he said.

Bodacious backsides and public nudity are, of course, not new.

British psychologist Philip Carr-Gomm, who put out the book “A Brief History of Nakedness” in 2010, goes back to ancient times.

Judeo-Christian sensibilities had the wealthy in opulent all-over gear and the poor raggedly naked, he said. But in a Classical context, from the Greeks and Romans, nudity was a symbol of power and beauty among the gods and goddesses -- and politicians.

“Napoleon, for instance, had himself carved naked in that tradition,” Carr-Gomm said by telephone from Lewes, outside London. “The contradictory attitude is there right from the beginning. We want to see it. We don’t want to see it. We hate it. We love it.”

When it comes to 2014, there was definitely skin in the game.

Esco, the filmmaker, actress and “Free the Nipple” activist, based her December movie on true events, when women protesters in search of equality demonstrated tops off around the globe.

“It’s been such a struggle getting the movie out there, because of the title, because of the content,” she bemoaned. “But the nipple has become the Trojan horse to really start a dialogue.”

Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2014/12/28/3500996/skin-was-in-for-2014.html#storylink=cpy

For some patients, it's more than just cosmetic surgery

Tue, 12/30/2014



 

By Meredith Cohen Carroll

Dr. Michael Bateman performed two surgeries on Alex Parrish, who had a cleft lip and palate. In this 2013 photo, Bateman checks his young patient’s
Dr. Michael Bateman performed two surgeries on Alex Parrish, who had a cleft lip and palate. In this 2013 photo, Bateman checks his young patient's progress. (Photo courtesy of Michael Bateman)

 

When my internist tells me my potassium levels look good, I'm flattered. The call from the gynecologist letting me know my Pap smear is normal? I blow kisses through the phone line.

When doctors guide patients expertly and kindly to a healthy resolution, it's understandable how a sentimental tenderness might be projected on the medical pilot.

Not all doctors have specialties that make them seem like a catch, though. For instance, when you compare brain surgery and plastic surgery, on the surface it's basically tumors vs. tummy tucks, with the inclination to feel a deeper emotion for the one whose job at Christmastime isn't fulfilling wishes of Juvederm and Botox.

If you'd told me that at the end of this year — which has been all-but consumed with a breast cancer diagnosis and the subsequent reconstruction process — that I'd feel the most affection for my plastic surgeon, I'd say you were mistaking me for a "Real Housewife of Aspen" (which, technically, I am, although my life is filled with far more lumps than luxury).

My oncologist was McDreamy-like as he poured eagerly through the minutiae of my medical history. I continue to have a great adoration for my breast surgeon, too, who said at one post-op visit when I expressed concern that my temporary implants might burst whenever my younger daughter banged her head against me, "Oh, don't worry. I had a patient get run over by her husband and while she cracked a few ribs, her saline never so much as leaked."

When I first consulted with the plastic surgeon whom I ultimately chose to perform my reconstruction, Dr. Michael Bateman at Denver's Rose Medical Center, his warmth rivaled that of Elsa from "Frozen," which is to say: icy. Before I could finish describing the breasts I envisioned waking up with after my bilateral mastectomy, he interrupted me.

"Look," he said flatly. "The point here is to get rid of the cancer. If we can make you look good in clothes afterward, we'll have done our job."

To be fair, his response wasn't much cozier than the other plastic surgeons I'd met, including the doctor who, when I asked if she would choose silicone implants or TRAM flap surgery if she were me, responded with an indifferent shrug, "Me? I don't know; I don't have breast cancer."

Still, having Dr. Bateman manage my expectations before surgery was preferable to a lifetime supply of Kleenex and a chest full of missed opportunities and regrets once the stitches were healed. I'd had enough doctors telling me up until that point what I was desperate to hear, including that the calcifications on my first-ever mammogram were probably normal. Hope is a delightful back-up plan. In the meantime, I was channeling the Boy Scouts with my frantic need to be prepared.

Subsequent appointments confirmed Dr. Bateman's lack of good cheer. I jokingly said he should throw in some free liposuction to go with my new breasts; he mumbled something about insurance fraud. When I ultimately conceded that I'd defer to his opinion on the size and aesthetics of my implants, "Since you went to school for this and I didn't," I said, he gave me the same look I give my husband on the occasions he tells me that I should wash the dishes instead of him because I'm just so much better at it, which is to say: Gee, thanks.

His stubborn refusal to join me in a laugh was notable, but even more remarkable was the realization he could have chosen the route of so many other plastic surgeons and been all about nose jobs and skin peels. After all, health insurance companies aren't eager to agree that collagen injections and butt implants are medical necessities. That means the real "Real Housewives" are paying full price and out of pocket for things like cellulite treatments and face lifts. Patients like me, on the other hand, have our surgeries heavily discounted and at least partially covered by insurance.

"I only make 30 cents on the dollar in breast cancer cases," one plastic surgeon sniffed at me during a consultation.

Upon entering Dr. Bateman's lobby, you see the requisite extravagant creams and costly potions on display atop a bed of crystals. However, it was a far cry from another plastic surgeon's office I visited, wherein the receptionist's lips were so large and pillowy I debated asking if I may lay my head on them for a nap. On the walls were pictures of celebrities whose comically large breasts are apparently a selling point.

But once you get past his reception area and into an exam room, make it through a surgery or two (or in my case, four) — not to mention countless pre- and post-op appointments — what you grasp is that buried not too deeply under Dr. Bateman's stoicism is his heart, which grows three sizes each day. He and his exceedingly kindhearted staff share in the candid joy that comes from helping so many patients blossom at the moment they assumed they'd feel all but extinguished as women.

It takes some amount of guts to be the person who decides to take on the task of fixing someone on the outside so they can take their eyes off the mirror and focus on the more critical internal healing. The weight of my self-esteem was on Dr. Bateman's shoulders. If I avoided my reflection before breast cancer, he risked shouldering the blame if my body image further disintegrated afterward.

Dr. Bateman is not just about reconstruction, either, although it is about 70 percent of what he does. Gunshot and burn victims are also among his patients. And each month, he quietly donates his time and talent to the cleft palate team at Rose Medical Center, which provides compassionate, coordinated and comprehensive care for more than 200 children with facial birth defects each year.

Shortly after my second surgery, I called him late on a Sunday night, describing a gurgling sound in my implants coupled with a popping feel.

"Did you just get back to altitude from sea level?" he asked.

"Yes," I said.

"Then it's normal. We don't really know why that happens, but it's not uncommon under these circumstances. Kind of funny though, huh?"

I felt warm and fuzzy as we chuckled together for a few minutes before hanging up.

He didn't save my life, he just made it prettier, although I'm starting to think that might have been a life-saving measure all on its own.

To make a donation to benefit the cleft lip and palate programs at Rose Medical Center as well as Children's hospital, visit http://www.dashforsmiles.org.

Meredith C. Carroll (meredithccarroll@hotmail.com) writes regularly for The Denver Post.

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